How To Remove Condensation And Moisture From Inside A Ring Camera Lens

Have you ever noticed your Ring camera suddenly producing blurred or foggy images? I certainly did, and upon investigation, I discovered that the issue was not with the image quality settings but a tiny droplet of water and fogging on the camera’s lens dome. 

In short, here is how to remove moisture from a Ring camera lens:

To remove moisture from your Ring camera, bring your camera inside for a few hours. If that does not work, carefully disassemble the device, unscrew and remove the fogged-up lens dome, and heat it to evaporate the moisture. Reassemble the camera afterward, ensuring that all parts are correctly placed and secured.

If your Ring camera or doorbell is under warranty, contact Ring customer support first. 

Ring Doorbell Fogged Lens - Water in Lens

Look closely, and you can see a drop of water in the lens!

A First-Hand Guide: Removing Condensation or Moisture from Your Ring Camera

As an owner of a Ring Video Doorbell 2, I recently faced an issue where my camera’s picture quality became blurred. I know there are lots of reasons a Ring camera can appear blurry. Upon inspection, I discovered the problem was due to a droplet of water and fogging on the lens dome. 

I decided to tackle this issue head-on, and here’s how I did it. Before you follow along, keep in mind that this process might void your warranty, and there’s a chance you could permanently damage your device. Proceed with caution.

Make sure it’s not dirt on the lens, or the UV coating starting to peel.

With some resourcefulness and careful handling, I managed to restore my Ring camera to its former glory, and I am here to share the step-by-step process with you.

Step 1: Disassemble the Camera

I started by unscrewing the four screws on the back of my Ring camera. The location of the screws will vary depending on which model you have. 

For example, the screws on Ring Video Doorbell Wired are on the front, and you have to pop off the front cover to access them.

Next, I used a small flathead screwdriver to pry the aluminum back from both sides, freeing the plastic back panel. The back panel has the battery attached to it, so lift gently and remove the power connector from the circuit board. The back panel can be set to the side.

On the inside of the front panel, I found three additional screws holding the circuit board to the front casing. 

The number of screws will vary depending on which model you have, but there will be some screws you need to remove in order to pull the circuit boards out.

After unscrewing these, I was able to access the camera and the lens on the circuit board.

The camera lens has its only assembly, which is attached to the circuit board. This does not need to be removed.

I found that the lens dome itself was screwed into the lens assembly. (See the picture below). 

Tip: Make a mark of where it is lined up, so you can screw it back into the same place when done.

When I unscrewed the lens dome and blew into it, some water squirted me in the face. So I got some water out, but I needed to get all the moisture out. 

In order to remove all the moisture, I stuck it in my oven at 120 degrees for about half an hour.

Step 2: Dry the Lens Dome

When I unscrewed the lens dome and blew into it, some water squirted me in the face. So I got some water out, but I needed to get all the moisture out. 

In order to remove all the moisture, I stuck it in my oven at 120 degrees for about half an hour.

I initially tried drying the lens dome using a hair dryer, but that was taking too long. 

After baking, the lens dome was clear, and the moisture successfully evaporated.

I screwed the lens dome back into the assembly, lining up the marks to make sure it hit the right level for focus.

Step 3: Reassemble the Camera

I then reassembled the camera in reverse order of disassembly, trying not to cause any damage. After reassembly, the lens dome was clear, and the camera seemed to be functioning normally with a nice clear image!

This method isn’t exclusive to Ring doorbells. It can work on their other cameras as well, for example, here is a picture of moisture built up in a Ring Spotlight Cam.

Moisture in lens of Ring Spotlight Battery Camera

Final Thoughts

This method worked for me and hopefully works for you as well. 

You should be very careful when disassembling and reassembling your Ring camera to avoid causing any permanent damage.

Be especially careful when working with the circuit boards. There are plenty of reasons your Ring camera may be offline. You don’t want a fried circuit board to be one of those reasons.

If you don’t feel comfortable doing this, I recommend contacting Ring’s customer service. They will usually give you a discount to buy a new one if your camera isn’t under warranty. 

Ring also recommends not exposing their products to excessive water, even though their outdoor-rated products are weather resistant.

Josh

Hey, I’m Josh! Welcome to Expert Home Automation. Tech is what I do for a living and as a hobby. You can learn more about me here.

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